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PR hand signals

Glencore’s pending IPO has generated much speculation about how the firm will stand up to the scrutiny of life as a public company.  However, two more common names are also making headlines for their IR/PR and they demonstrate different approaches to managing reputation under the glare of the spotlight.  First up, Google.  Investors and analysts were miffed after CEO Larry Page spent only three minutes on the company’s recent earnings call and did not participate in Q&A.  Unconventional, but remember that Google is the same company that did its IPO via dutch auction and deprived Wall Street banks of millions in guaranteed fees.  Google has never given earnings guidance and its “Owner’s Manual for Google Shareholders” states that Google is “not a conventional company [and doesn’t] intend to become one.”  The challenge of IR is getting Wall Street to buy into the long-term vision, especially in times, like now for GOOG, when the short-term expectations of investors are not being met.  GOOG trades around $525, so most are trusting Page’s vision thing.  But, Therese Poletti at MarketWatch wonders if the “company still merits its unconventional stance toward Wall Street.

While Google seemingly thumbs its nose at the conventional way of doing things, Goldman Sachs is sitting on its thumbs and other fingers as it tries to convince the world that it is the kindler, gentler vampire squid.  Andrew Sorkin of the New York Times is bewildered by Goldman’s continuing spin about their mortgage market investments and hedges during the housing meltdown.  “Goldman Sachs did not take a large directional ‘bet’ against the U.S. housing market,” said Goldman last year.  For some, that doesn’t square with the fact that it was $3.8 billion short the housing market and $3.3 billion long housing market in 2007.  Sorkin says Goldman should stop tap dancing and “be proud of its prescient call about housing.  It was better for its shareholders, and frankly better for the taxpayers, that the firm was smart enough to short the mortgage market.

Goldman also downplays trading in its latest earnings news release.  In fact the word “trading” does not appear in the news release and related materials for Goldman’s Q1 earnings announced on April 19.  I repeat, no mention of trading.  CNBC points out that last year, the announcement mentioned “trading” nine times and in 2006, “trading” popped up 11 times in one quarter.  Truth is in Q1, Goldman’s equities and fixed income traders hauled in more than $2 billion in revenue.  Not bad for the business no one wants to talk about.

As it deals with media and investors and uncomfortable truths, will Glencore emulate Goldman and play by the rules but try to keep the truth obscured by sleight of hand?  Or will it follow Google and give a more decipherable, perhaps Swiss, hand gesture to those who want transparency about their business?  Hang loose, we’ll find out soon enough.

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