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The golden age of shareholder activism

We are in the golden age of hedge fund carpe diemshareholder activism and the evidence is everywhere

Will activist hedge funds seize the day or will they squander this opportunity to transform fundcorporate governance and how the market holds boards and management accountable for poor performance?

Corporate defenders like Mr. Lipton are trying to frame the debate around the issue of long term value.  Hedge funds, they argue, are short term opportunists that interfere with corporations’ ability to manage for the long term.

This week Larry Fink, CEO of BlackRock, sent a letter to CEO of every S&P 500 company advocating for greater focus on creating long term value.  While the letter doesn’t specifically reference activist hedge funds, it does call into question why companies raise dividends and buy back shares — some of the low hanging fruit that a company use to placate an activist.  BlackRock, though, is working all angles.  It also is a member of the recently formed Shareholder-Director Exchange which aims to formalize how corporations engage with institutional shareholders.  (The Conference Board also has developed a set of principles to increase public trust in big business.) Yet, despite these efforts to work within the system, BlackRock voted with dissident shareholders 34% of the time last year.

There is a real issue tied to short vs long-termism.  The ratio of corporate cash to capex is almost at all time low (click to see chart), raising the important question of whether corporations are investing enough to be competitive in the future.  It appears disingenuous, though, to suggest that activism is the cause.

If defenders of the status quo are really concerned with long term growth and corporations delivering on long term strategy, they should be as vocal about the myriad of other factors that work contrary to those principles. Take the issue of quarterly earnings guidance. Most companies still provide earnings guidance and presumably manage based on that guidance. I would argue that is a greater short term pressure on corporate America than any group of hedge funds.

In order to capitalize on the tailwinds that are helping activists, they must realize that their reputation is the most powerful weapon in their arsenal.  Funds that strike an effective balance between quiet advocacy and calibrated confrontation with boards, establish working relationships with pension funds, and become viewed as positive agents for change by the media, proxy advisory firms and others in the corporate governance arena will be the ones who translate the golden age of activism into riches for their LPs.

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